Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Yummy, Tofu Ricotta Stuffed Gluten-Free Ravioli!

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Ravioli pasta salad!
Tofu-ricotta filled ravioli is one of my great loves (anyone remember the Soy Boy Tofu Ravioli of yor??), and I have greatly missed eating them since going GF. In my initial gluten-free tantrum stage, which sadly lasted several years, I even gave away my old Atlas hand-cranked pasta maker and ravioli attachment, since I thought I'd never have use of them again.

Now that I have better gluten ditching skills and a sweeter disposition, I thought I'd try making them again. And lo! I had very, very good success! In fact these came out so yummy, I made them twice in a row since the tofu ricotta I made was enough for two batches. :))

The first few batches of ravioli were gobbled down piping hot with nothing on top but a drizzle of good olive oil, freshly ground pepper and salt.

Today, I decided to do something different with the last few I had remaining. With whatever plants I had floating around the kitchen, I whipped up a delicious pasta salad. The one pictured in this post contained steamed broccoli, watercress, capers, carrot shavings, sweet bell peppers, black olives and lots of fresh parsley. I tossed the whole lot with a balsamic-mustard vinaigrette and gobbled it up. 

Here's a quick time-lapse video showing the ravioli forming process.

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A photo of the first batch from Instagram. I reduced the turmeric a little!! Ha Ha.

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I am all about tons of fresh herbs.
Yummy,  Yummy Gluten-Free Ravioli
Makes about 26 large, round ravioli
Before you start, please read through the notes and recipe below, then watch the quick video!

Since gluten-free flours are heavy and notoriously hard to measure accurately, they're offered in grams below. If you don't have a scale, cup measurements are also listed, please use a spoon to fill each measuring cup, then level with a knife. Don't scoop into the flour, or you'll end up using too much.

I developed this recipe using Bob's Red Mill Garbanzo Flour. If you try this with besan or gram flour, you might get different results, as they can absorb liquids differently and have alternate textures.

To make a super-fast tofu ricotta: mash extra-firm tofu into a large bowl with a few tablespoons of nutritional yeast flakes. Blend a small handful of raw cashews with about 1/3 cup water and a clove of garlic, then pulse in a big handful of cilantro. Mix the blended cashew mixture into the tofu with an immersion blender until you get a ricotta-like texture (or I bet you can throw it into the blender jar). Add salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

To store uncooked ravioli, simply let them dry out a little bit uncovered at room temperature, then place in a covered dish and refrigerate up to three days. For longer storage, freeze them in a single layer on parchment, then store in a zip style bag until ready to cook. Drop them into the boiling water while frozen, and cook them a little longer to compensate.

What You Need:
♥ 211g / 1 1/2 cups Bob's Red Mill 1 to 1 GF baking flour
♥ 44g / 1/3 cup garbanzo bean flour
♥ 1/2 teaspoon salt
♥ 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum
♥ 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
 55g /1/3 cup tapioca flour, divided in half
♥ 1/4 cup aquafaba
♥ 1/2 cup cold water

 parchment paper
♥ a glass with an opening diameter about 3"across
 2 1/2" round ravioli punch/cutter (like this one)
♥ thin metal spatula
♥ small dish of water or extra aquafaba

 tofu ricotta or another ravioli filling of your choice (the one described above is enough for two batches of ravioli).

What You Do:
Into a medium-sized bowl add the gluten-free baking flour, garbanzo bean flour, salt, xanthan, turmeric and HALF the tapioca flour. Whisk to combine.

Add the aquafaba and water and stir with a spoon until the dough begins to come together. Continue with your hands, working the mixture until it becomes a well formed ball of dough. It might take a couple of minutes to get the ingredients uniformly combined, just keep at it!

If you plan to eat the ravioli right away, fill a large pot with water and a pinch of salt and bring to a boil. If the water comes to a boil while you're still forming the ravioli, simply reduce it to a simmer while you continue to work.

Lay out a large piece of parchment where you plan to make the ravioli. Divide the dough in half and sprinkle each with a little of the remaining tapioca. Dust the parchment and the rolling pin, too.

Using the rolling pin, roll out half of the dough onto the parchment as thin as you can get it--aim for between 1/8-1/16" thick. Use the parchment to move the dough around as you work, this will help you get it even and uniform. The dough should roll out easily--use a little more tapioca if it begins to stick anywhere.

Once the dough is rolled out, use the mouth of the glass to cut out as many 3" circles as possible. Pull away the scrap dough and set aside to re-roll. Loosen the dough circles from the parchment, using the spatula, if necessary. Place a heaping teaspoon of filling into the center of a round. Dip your finger into the water or aquafaba and run it around the circumference of a second dough circle, then place it wet side down, on top of the first circle. Run your finger around the circumference of the dough sammich, sealing them together and gently pressing out excess air. Press the ravioli cutter around the ravioli and press down firmly. Pull of the excess dough (set aside with the scrap dough) and gently release the ravioli from the cutter and set aside. Continue forming ravioli with the remaining dough circles.

Repeat with the second half of dough, then continue with the scrap dough, rolling and re-rolling it until none is left. The beauty of working with a gluten-free dough is you can't really overwork it!

When the ravioli are formed and ready to cook, reduce the boiling water to a gentle boil. Lower the ravioli slowly into the water and be sure they don't settle on the bottom, or they'll begin to stick to the pot. After a minute or so, they will slowly rise to the surface of the water and float. Once risen, continue to cook them for 3-4 minutes, until they're tender to your taste.

Drain and eat!

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xo kittee

Disclosure:  This post is filled with lots of affiliate links. If you click on a link and buy something from Amazon, I'll receive a really teeny-tiny compensation.

4 comments:

  1. Thank you Kittee for posting this xo As always your instructions are clear and detailed effortlessly, and so interesting to read! That first note about measuring the flour made me go 'Ahhh' being relatively new to gluten free baking that explained my 'why didn't this turn out like last time?' head scratching. You're the best and yes, all the herbs!!

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  2. Drooooooling!!! You make it look so easy and I love how you made a pasta salad out of them. YUM!! Hehe...I remember my gluten-free tantrum stage...not my finest moment (year).

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  3. These look so amazing and I am so happy for you to be eating ravioli again!!! It's also wonderful that your little ravioli pals are so smiley! :)

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